Thread: What young adult book series should become the next big thing?

  • avatar
    • 8 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 2014
    One Young Adult book series that I'm surprised it hasn't been brought to the big screen is this one:



    Yeah,from Clive Barker,the same guy who brought us this:



    and this



    I bought it some years ago thinking it was another one of Barker's dark urban fantasy novels -like Weaveworld or Imajica- but it turned out to be a surprisingly juvenile book (but well written and exquisitively illustrated by Barker himself). I'm really surprised this book and its sequels doesn't have a larger following. Maybe it's because everyone associates Barker with horror.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 714
    A few years ago, I thought YA fantasy books were far more fun to read because of the lowered expectations. But most seem to be derived from other series that are selling well and publishers want to cash in.

    The last book I was intrigued by was called The Search For WondLa. The illustrations are fantastic, but the story just didn't deliver like I'd hoped.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    Heh, an octopus-faced demon, with body glitter & pink sequins, that'd be a riot.
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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 4137
    Pray to the heavens above and beyond that they don't give the Twilight treatment to any of the aforementioned epic series.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1982
    I like Clark Ashton Smith's "Hyperborea".
    Quote by tangspot2
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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    I've read one or two of the grey mouser books. They were "ok", but ...I don't know... They just kinda fell flat somehow.

    I think I read a couple books by moorcock (the name is impossible to forget), but if I did, they didn't make enough of an impression on me to remember anything at all about them.

    I've never heard of the other 2 books nor authors. I might have to look into them though.
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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1485
    ^^ LoL the second book was written by a guy named Moorcock.
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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 2014
    You kids need to read better fantasy.

    The Fafher & Grey Mouser series by Fritz Leiber.



    It was on this series that Gary Gigax was inspired from for creating D&D,not fucking LOTR.



    Screw the Dark Elf series (or anything by Salvatore). This is the white-haired badass that should have his own HBO series.



    Awesome fantasy world that more people should know of.



    This series -about a nameless,all-powerful travelling sorcerer- is not about dragons or epic battles but rather about the moral consequences of using magic.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1982
    Quote by Drahken
    As far as that list of series, I've only ever heard of 3, even now...
    You're three years older than I am, so we are talking about approx. same time period. I read all of those (except Hardy Boys since I wasn't really into mysteries either) and I know there were some others. But I really had an advantage in discovering books, since my mother is a librarian. I spent hours in the public library every week, and took out so many books to read I couldn't carry them all myself. (Eventually mom made a rule about that...) I read James and the Giant Peach in one day. I pretty much plopped my butt on the floor in the fiction section and made my way across the library over the years, devouring almost anything.

    It's true that things are more classified now but I don't know if it's better. I always read across the age spectrum, and if "young adult" was segregated from "children's" I would have missed out on some great stuff, considering social life decimated my library time in high school.
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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    Our public library when I was a kid was pretty big. It's possible that they did have more series along these lines but stashed them someplace stupid & illogical, I just know that they didn't have any in the age-appropriate area.

    At the timeframe in question, I wasn't in jr high yet, so their library doesn't apply. The elementary schools' libraries were always tiny little wastes of space.
    Even if the jr high's libray had been applicable, it was only a fraction of the size of the public library. It's only advantage was that it's entirety was devoted to a narrow age range. Even so, I found it impossible to find any series. All that were there (besides encyclopedias) were nonfiction & fiction which was so real-world that it might as well have been non-fiction.
    @sunriser: You would have loved my jr high library, it had lots of biography type stuff (bored me to tears).

    As for my sr high library... 1) I had only ever been in it a few times. We never "officially" went there for any classes or anything, and getting a pass to go there for study hall was a tedious & annoying process, just not worth the effort. On top of that, it's a distinct case of too little/too late. I had already passed the crisis point, found my own sources, and moved on to adult fiction. I pretty much bypassed the "young adult" genre entirely.

    Dragonlance ftw.


    There is one other series I was into, which I guess might be "young adult". However, it was placed in the adult fiction section of the library & never had any "young adult" labels or anything. Xanth.
    While more recent xanth books place themselves pretty squarely in the "young adult" genre, I think the earlier ones (which were the ones I read) were just general adult fiction.
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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1368
    Quote by The_Batman
    Encyclopedia Brown...I loved that series as a kid


    Sounds cool! One summer I liked writing 2 page mystery stories, prolly would have dug that series as a kid
    [img]http://archive.kontek.net/saturn.classicgaming.gamespy.com/content/md/reviews/c/contra_hard_corps/2.jpg[/img]
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 4137
    Quote by Sunriser
    Quote by Dyzfunk7ional
    The Hobbit 2012. I can only hope...


    This is already happening. Well, in 2013.


    Yah I know. I was refering to them doing justice to the book. Wich is something just to 'hope' for.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 168
    @Drahken- Sucks that you grew up with such a small library. I grew up in the time period you are talking about in a small rural town but our community has always had a huge public library we stocked and two huge libraries for our JR and Sr high schools. Our Jr high librarian was extremely dedicated to books and she always knew the latest juvenile literature coming out by genres even. She knew I loved supernatural/fantasy/sci-fi so when something new came out she pulled it for me. Also had a list of recommends. I agree that young adult series were not as saturated with the variety you have today but besides romance and horror back in the day what other novels where so popular? I do remember there were quite a few young adult series based on popular tv shows. I remember reading Some star trek and TNG novels when they first came out. Personally as a girl it was really hard to find books that were sci-fi/fantasy/supernatural geared toward women. Most of stuff marketed toward my demographic were Sweet Valley, sleep Over Friends and Babysitters Club and transitioned from the angst ridden paperbacks into supermarket lines shelves of housewife porno titled Harlequin romances lol.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 3803
    I was never into young adult. Barely into Juvenile as well like the Fudge series or Beverly Cleary/Judy Blume. Fiction always bored me to tears. If they'd had more biographies and historical books for kids my age, I would have enjoyed reading more. I'm weird, I know.

    The only thing I ever followed was Fear Street. I think they could do a lot with this series today. Lots of Sci-Fi and paranormal stuff that is currently popular.


    Quote by Dyzfunk7ional
    The Hobbit 2012. I can only hope...


    This is already happening. Well, in 2013.
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 148
    I didn't see your post, because I didn't read past page 1 when I replied to your post.
    Michael
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    @mlauzon: As I said in the post just above yours, I had forgotten about hardy/drew because I was never into mysteries & never read those books. While I did read a couple ecyclopedia brown books, the same applies to them. I did forget them, because they were mysteries.

    As far as "the list goes on...", please feel free to elaborate. If there were others that I was unaware of, I'd be interested in knowing about them.
    signature *WARNING: The above post may be highly opinionated, read at your own risk.

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  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1485
    I don't really care, just as long as they don't have gay vampires in it.
    Shit happens when You fart naked

    Retro pimpin aint easy
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 148
    Quote by Drahken
    Young adult series were virtually unheard of when I was a kid. Pretty much the only one that existed then was chronicles of narnia.


    You're forgetting about Encyclopedia Brown, The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, the list goes on....
    Michael
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    Quote by jitteryjewel

    I think there were plenty of young adult series they were just classified straight Juvinile litarature.


    Quote by stake_n_sheak
    Hardy Boys, Ramona Quimby, LOTR, Oz, Mrs Piggle-wiggle, Uncle Wiggily, Bre'r Rabbit/Anansi...? Or do you consider all of those for other age groups?



    No, it's not about age groups like that (hell, I don't think they even had "young adult" at the time, at least not at my library. They just had a couple floors for "adult" (one fiction, one non-fiction), and one floor for "children's". If it wasn't "adult", it got tossed into children's. There were no further subdivisions.)
    Essentially, anything for people under the age of 18 would fall into the range of this discussion. For reference, the timeframe I'm talking about was the mid-80s.

    As far as that list of series, I've only ever heard of 3, even now (hardy boys, oz, lotr), and only 1 of them was known to me back then (hardy boys). I never was a mystery buff, so the hardy boys & nancy drew books were never of interest to me at the time, and I had forgotten about them until you brought them up.
    Oz & lotr I knew of as movies at the time, but didn't know anything about them having books. Bre'r rabbit I know from the disney cartoons, but to this day didn't know there were books. Ramona, piggle, wiggily, this is the first I've ever heard of those.

    There's only 1 other series I can think of that existed back then (or at least, that was carried in my area), the bunnicula series. However, there were only about 3 books in it, so it's a little hard to think of it as a 'series".

    Believe me, I desperately wished that there had been series then, it would have made my life WAAAYYYY easier. I've always been an avid reader, but hit a huge snarl around 4th-6th grade, trying to find viable reading material. You walk into a library & you're confronted with a wall of homogeny, how do you begin to narrow down the possibilities?? Sometimes I'd get lucky & find several books by the same author, but even that was uncommon. The only things that kept me reading were comic books & choose your own adventure. (Yes, CYOA is technically a series, but the stories have absolutely no connection to each other, so it's not useful as such for the sake of this discussion.)
    While the manic-obsession around it now makes me avoid harry potter like a plague, I would have been thrilled if such had existed back then.

    Talking about this does however remind me of one other series, though it came a bit later (early 90s); Photon. The photon books were what started to really pull me back into reading when I was about 14. They already had a TV series though (I think the series actually came first & the books were based on it).
    signature *WARNING: The above post may be highly opinionated, read at your own risk.

    Gee Caspah, you're a twicky one!
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 4137
    The Hobbit 2012. I can only hope...
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