Thread: John W. Campbell's Who Goes There novella, who's read it?

  • avatar
    • 8 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 942
    1951's version is good in it's own right but fails as an adaptation.

    The 1982 version is the definitive more faithful adaptation of the story as it had the proper technology and might have done Campbell proud to see his vision excuted on screen as well.
    "Nobody wants to see vampire killers or vampires either! apparently all they want are demented madmen running around in ski-masks hacking up young virgins"-Peter Vincent from Fright Night.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 2878
    Quote by Pinface

    And the 1951 was a terrible adaptation of the story


    But, would you say it was a good movie? That should more important than faithfulness to source material, especially when adapting a written story, which can always include prose that's impossible to adapt to screen. Polanski's movie, The Ninth Gate was not very faithful to its source material, The Club Dumas by Arturo Perez-Reverte, but it is still an enjoyable movie nonetheless.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 942
    And the 1951 was a terrible adaptation of the story
    "Nobody wants to see vampire killers or vampires either! apparently all they want are demented madmen running around in ski-masks hacking up young virgins"-Peter Vincent from Fright Night.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 10350
    Obviously you are.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpmILPAcRQo

    Come have the time of YOUR life with me and the gang at Retro-daze.org.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 942
    Quote by Guild_Navigator
    It's good,but no as good as At The Mountains of Madness,which came out about two or three years before Who Goes There.



    Guillermo Del Toro has been trying for years to film a faithful version but always encountered problems with the financeers. To quote Del Toro: "The studio was very nervous about the cost and it not having a love story or a happy ending, but it's impossible to do either in the Lovecraft universe." Gotta respect a man who doesn't sell out a project's vision.


    That was a good novella and Lovecraft with Campbell are geniuses.

    Anyone else glad Carpenter's version of The Thing was faithful to the story?
    "Nobody wants to see vampire killers or vampires either! apparently all they want are demented madmen running around in ski-masks hacking up young virgins"-Peter Vincent from Fright Night.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 4137
    ^ That was my last one from Lovecraft. Looking forward to The Shadow Out of Time.

    Guillermo Del Toro kicks ass. He's probably the best out there who can give justice to this genre.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 2014
    It's good,but no as good as At The Mountains of Madness,which came out about two or three years before Who Goes There.



    Guillermo Del Toro has been trying for years to film a faithful version but always encountered problems with the financeers. To quote Del Toro: "The studio was very nervous about the cost and it not having a love story or a happy ending, but it's impossible to do either in the Lovecraft universe." Gotta respect a man who doesn't sell out a project's vision.
  • avatar
    • 8 years 9 months ago
    • Posts: 942
    I read it when i was in high school and it's such a fantastic sci-fi horror story that is very influential.

    It had two cinematic adaptations in 1951 and 1982, John Carpenter's version remains the more truthful faithful adaptation of the story where the 1951 version had little to do with the original story since it was nothing like the novella.
    "Nobody wants to see vampire killers or vampires either! apparently all they want are demented madmen running around in ski-masks hacking up young virgins"-Peter Vincent from Fright Night.
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