Thread: Do you remember... Thanksgiving?

  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    [note: This is aimed at americans. While other countries have thanksgiving, the cultural situation is different, so this probably doesn't apply.]

    Do you remember when thanksgiving still existed? ....when it was an actual holiday, instead of just a day off from xmas shopping?

    Back in the 80s, thanksgiving was a good holiday. We had related decorations & activities all month long in school (who can forget hand-turkeys?), stores had displays & decorations, and TV networks had specials (few were actually thanksgiving related, but the mere fact that they were a special was good enough). The macy's parade was actually a fun experience (before they threw away most of the balloons & replaced them with a bunch of friggin broadway type crap).
    Now there is absolutely nothing thanksgiving related in any stores, the xmas stuff comes out almost before the halloween stuff does. There are no thanksgiving specials of any kind. Thanksgiving has become just a wasted day.
    signature *WARNING: The above post may be highly opinionated, read at your own risk.

    Gee Caspah, you're a twicky one!
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 2223
    Thanksgiving was always kind of boring at our house. For some reason we only did a big family Thanksgiving once at my aunts house. The rest of the time it was just my brother and sister and mom and dad and I. It was a day of snacking on walnuts and celery with cream cheese while we cooked Turkey and stuffing and squash and watched the parade. We brought up the Christmas decorations when the day was over. A lot of times we were so full from snacking while we cooked that we didn't eat much at actual "dinner" time but ate left overs for days LOL
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 4137
    Halloween/Thanksgiving/Christmas... out of those Thanksgiving has the least media hype. This modern world runs on media whores.
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 168
    Thanksgiving is still the big holiday for my family. We use to all meet at my Grandmothers house and enjoy a great meal followed by kids hanging out and adults playing pinochle. Now a days we usually rent a hall or cabin and everyone brings turkey or ham and side dishes. We extend our holiday out not just to our immediate family but our extended family and friends who might not have anywhere to spend the holidays. I never cared for the commercial aspect of the holidays always try to take the spirit of the season and carry that on instead. Maybe it comes from a long line of rural blue collar family but even if it were sharing a ham sandwich at least we were doing it together Anyone can do that!
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    Sometimes holidays do get too commercial (xmas starting in friggin october is a prime example). However, a holiday needs a certain degree of such commercialism to help set the mood. With no commercialism at all, you're left with arbor day.
    signature *WARNING: The above post may be highly opinionated, read at your own risk.

    Gee Caspah, you're a twicky one!
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 74775
    Pretty much all holidays start to get that way when you get older. Unless you're really religious it's pretty much just a day you don't have to go to work.
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 74775
    wow....thanks for this...so many memories flowing through my head now! Thanksgiving was such a huge deal when I was a kid! I grew up in Philly..lived in a tiny row home and had a gigantic family and I don't know how the hell my mom did it, but somehow she fit them all into our tiny home with our kithcen table and dining room table pushed together and us kids actually ate in our basement..which was totally o.k. with us as this was my '''play room"...toys, nintendo, pool table..and us all hovered around 2 card tables...it was chaos! It was the best! My favorite times were when a couple of my cousins stayed over....then the Sunday after we always helped my dad get the Christmas stuff up..ahhh...the yearly ritual of the untangling of the Christmas lights! Love it! Now I have me and my sons and we are far from family and now livong in Myrtle beach, I try to keep the day special for them, and we have our own traditions...but I truly and dearly miss those days...sigh...
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    I envy those of you who got to experience such things. All th family I ever had contact with growing up was miniscule. Everyone came over for thanksgiving, yet we never needed to set up a second table. I have always yearned for the big family/country type xmases that you see in all the movies.

    Despite that, the day was big & festive when I was a kid. There were the decorations & crafts in school and the decorations, coloring contests, etc in stores. Then on the actual day we would watch the parade (back when they still had lots of floats & balloons, not too many marching bands, and few hollywood/broadway type performers wasting camera time) while the smell of a roasting turkey filled the house. I enjoyed "being on the inside" of the preperations, setting the table, figuring out where to put everyone's coats, etc. We had "dinner" at around 2 or 3 in the afternoon, then afterward everyone would gradually wander home (except the annoying people that you wish never showed up at all, they tended to never leave).
    Even back then though, thanksgiving was always like xmas's baby brother. Not counting the parade, everything done for thanksgiving is also done for xmas, plus on xmas you get presents.
    As far as the xmas decorations go, we didn't have a set time that we started putting them up. It was usually sometime within the first week of december.

    These days I do pretty much nothing for thanksgiving. I still watch the parade/s, but only loosely. Spending all morning cooking a turkey is way too much effort for far too little reward, so I just boil some chicken instead.
    signature *WARNING: The above post may be highly opinionated, read at your own risk.

    Gee Caspah, you're a twicky one!
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 2223
    Now that i'm 31, and some relatives have passed and others I haven't seen since I was 13, I really wish that we had had big family gatherings. We never really had them and the few times we did I was such a brat, I HATED them. I was a quiet kid and it meant speaking to relatives I rarely saw and felt shy around and getting yelled at by my parents if it looked like I was being rude and not being sociable. Now I long for things like that. My great grandmother has been gone since 2000 and we used to go to her house every December. We'd only spend about half an hour there, so it was a very brief visit and at the time I always always felt akward. She was so loving towards me but I only saw her once a year for that brief half hour. She'd give me a card with 10 dollars in it from her and then a card with ten dollars in it from my grandfather and we'd eat fudge and cookies and then we'd leave. Now I feel sad that our holidays were only brother and sister, mother and father oriented and that they lacked aunts, uncles, cousins, grandmothers, etc. The thing is, most of them didn't live very far away at all. I think that there was some resentment somewhere in the family that caused us all to not be as super close as we could be and that is why we didn't do big family events, but I'm honestly not sure.
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 826
    Thanksgiving is a big holiday for my family. Typically growing up it would have involved 2 different meals. One big one around noon with my dads aunts, uncles, and cousins which was from a family of 12 brothers and sisters. It was a rather large get together. My mom's family would get together in the evening and she is from a family of 5 brothers and sisters. So it was pretty big as well. Now we only have one celebration. Its at my house and we have my parents and sister over as well as my wife's parents over. We talk and laugh and eat more than we should. I almost look more forward to it than Christmas.
    [img]http://i1139.photobucket.com/albums/n541/deliguy/warrior.jpg[/img]

    In my final meeting with the gods from the heavens above, as they spoke to me and hit me with the power of the Ultimate Warrior, they told me Exit stage left! Exit stage rig
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 10350
    Thanksgiving is the way it always was. A joyous holiday.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpmILPAcRQo

    Come have the time of YOUR life with me and the gang at Retro-daze.org.
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 572
    Ah yes, I remember back when Thanksgiving was an actual holiday. I can still remember the annual project the school would put up every year called "Turkeys with Dressing" in which you were given a cut out turkey and you had to create a disguise for them for Thanksgiving. And then once you were done they'd put it up in the lobby for everyone to see. Amongst our other disguises over the years we created a "Turkey Claus" which was always our favorite. Some of the other interesting creations students made were "Super Turkey", "Jail Bird" and one year I think someone even made Jack from Titanic,lol.

    In terms of Thanksgiving specials, the one's I used to watch were "King Kong", "March of the Wooden Soldiers", "The Thanksgiving that Almost Wasn't", whatever was on Nickelodeon...and naturally the parade.

    I also remember Thanksgiving itself. Now the location always varied and we tended to bounce around (including one year where we had our Thanksgiving at Perkins). But none really compared to Thanksgiving at home. I'd wake up early to catch the parade, sis would be busy sharing the kitchen with dad, preparing one of her more exotic creations for the Thanksgiving table and we'd do nothing but prepare food and watch old movies (such as King Kong and March of the Wooden Soldiers) until it was time for our guests to arrive and time for the main event, the turkey.

    Over the years we unfortunately the places at our table began to empty. My uncles, my grandmother, all passed away, leaving a spot that could never be filled. And I guess that's when Thanksgiving stopped being a holiday for us. Sure we still celebrate it with my in-laws, but it's never the same.
    [img]http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/Geminiguy/alBundy2.jpg[/img]
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 390
    I agree that commercialization of Halloween and Christmas have helped push Thanksgiving aside but I've also seen the country moving away from our traditional holidays for fear of offending anyone. Halloween offends some Christians and Muslims do not celebrate it, hence many schools now do not decorate for Halloween. Christmas offends non-Christians, that's how we ended up with Holiday trees and the generic Happy Holidays greeting. And I would have to assume Thanksgiving offends Native Americans and possibly others.
    Therefor the only solution is to stop celebrating all holidays or mention every single religious deviation and apologize if anyone is still offended.
    [img]http://images8.cpcache.com/product/retro-old+school-official+product/426920518v1_225x225_Front.jpg[/img]
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 726
    For my family Thanksgiving is the weekend we shut down our cottage for the year. We keep it very family oriented. Everyone contributes something to the meal. Also my mother and a few of my relatives have October and November birthdays so we celebrate them all at once.

    Lewis BlacK has a great bit about how Thanksgiving used to be more than "Christmas halftime."
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 1268
    After 9-11, nobody gives a damn about whether or not muslims are offended. That might not be fair, but it's true nonetheless.

    I'm an atheist myself, yet I enjoy "christian" holidays like xmas & easter. The thing is that such holidays have not really been religous in nature for a very long time. Days like xmas & easter as they are presently celebrated are far more secular than religous. Even when I was a kid, santa & xmas trees represented the holiday infinitely more than jesus & crosses. Likewise, I never viewed easter as a religous event, even when I was little. I always viewed it as a celebration of spring.


    Many indians (I don't buy into using 20 syllables to say what can be said in just a few, just to be "P C". Besides, being part cherokee myself, I can use whatever terminology I prefer here :p ) do object to thanksgiving & even have counter-parades & the like. While I agree wioth the sentiment behind it, those people are choosing the wrong thing to protest. Thanksgiving was a rare event which was not about the palefaces taking over, but about peace between the two. They'd be better off protesting columbus day, or the day the mayflower landed.
    signature *WARNING: The above post may be highly opinionated, read at your own risk.

    Gee Caspah, you're a twicky one!
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 572
    Quote by Drahken
    After 9-11, nobody gives a damn about whether or not muslims are offended. That might not be fair, but it's true nonetheless.


    Tell that to Halloween and all the schools who can't celebrate it.
    [img]http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/Geminiguy/alBundy2.jpg[/img]
  • avatar
    • 9 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 3803
    Thanksgiving is actually still a big deal, especially in school because it is the one holiday everyone can celebrate and they love all the history and social lessons associated with it. Unfortunately, the grown-up world is different- stores don't make much money off of food, so they hype all the sales. And like many people here, much of my family has since moved away or died. I married into a big family, but they're not big on TG. In fact, my Father In Law's family is actually going on a cruise that week. I'll be going to my Mother In Law's new house with my parents.

    And actually, they play quite a lot of Thanksgiving episodes/movies on TV, but they're hard to catch. You should buy the Peanuts/Garfield holiday specials. The Peanuts one includes a cartoon about the pilgrims that's really interesting.
  • avatar
    • 9 years 6 months ago
    • Posts: 1982
    Every year on Thanksgiving WGN plays a documentary about Bozo the Clown, then they play some other old stuff like black & white "Jingle Bells" cartoon and some Kukla Fran & Ollie stuff. I watch it on the while I peel potatoes and prep turkey and then all our friends come over. After dinner we play music or a movie and everybody hangs out.
    Quote by tangspot2
    Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
    • 9 years 6 months ago
    • Posts: 105
    ah yes, thanksgiving! my tradition would be to get up at around 8, set the dvr the night before, that way i can see the parade, from 9-12 would be my hour to watch the parade. then i'd shower, and get ready for thanksgiving dinner. now, it depends where we have it. my current location, (moreno valley, CA), my house is bigger there, so we sometimes have dinner there, but sometimes we'd have it at grandma's. but if i stayed with grandma for the holidays, it's granny's big tradition to turn on KOST-FM, (anybody from LA here know the deal here?), and listen to the christmas music while we cruise the 91 to the 15 freeway.
    a 90's kid, and i'm damn proud of it!

    skype username and contact: thompson.tyrone
  • avatar
    • 9 years 6 months ago
    • Posts: 624
    Thanksgiving was great in my house. My gparents use to live upstairs and we'd all eat dinner up there and eat till we were stuffed. Such good memories. Now, sadly, I have very few family left (most are dead/out of stsate) so it will never be the same again.
    Visit my '80s blog, subscribe, comment, etc -> http://msoldschool.livejournal.com/
Forum Staff
Super Admin: Vertex
Super Mods
Online Users
Search