{"title":"Now You See It","dateDebut":"1974","dateEnd":"1989","description":"\"Every answer ... to every question ... is hidden somewhere in this maze of letters. And NOW ... YOU ... SEE ... IT!\"\r\n\r\nThe popular pasttime of Wordsearch was used as the basis for this 1970s Goodson-Todman game show, where contestants were asked to search for answers to general-knowledge questions hidden inside a 4-by-14 array of jumbled letters.\r\n\r\nThe show enjoyed two runs \u0097 a 14-month run in 1974 and 1975, and again for four months in mid-1989. Jack Narz hosted the 1970s version, while newscaster Chuck Henry handled the emcee duties in 1989.\r\n\r\nSeveral different formats were used throughout the 1970s run, but they all revolved around the basic premise of finding answers in the letter maze. Initially, four new contestants played on each show, each placed on teams of two for the first round, called the Elimination Round. Host Narz read a question, and the first contestant to ring in called out the line that he\/she believed had the answer; his\/her partner then called out where exactly in that line the answer began. If the team was correct, they earned points based on the answer's location (e.g., line 4 and position 6 earned the team 10 points). Two rounds were played, with the team in the lead after an undefined time limit advanced to the Qualifying Round, where they now played against each other. In the Qualifying Round, Narz read a question, and the letters in the word filled in one at a time; the first to guess four words correctly earned the right to face the returning champion in a game similar to the Elimination Round. The winner of that round was champion advanced to the Solo Round.\r\n\r\nIn the Solo Round, the contestant's goal was to find 10 words hidden in a new jumble of letters. Each correct answer was worth $100, and getting all 10 words won the contestant $5,000 (plus $1,000 for each show it went unclaimed). If the champion won, he\/she retired undefeated, and the runner up from the previous game returned to the next game as champion.\r\n\r\nDuring the 1989 version, two new contestants played. The scoring system changed, and was based on the player's quickness in finding the answer. The winner of that round advanced to meet the returning champion, where the two contestants were given a category and had to find six words fitting it. The winner was the first to reach $1,000, and advanced to the bonus round, played the same as the 1970s version (only this time, the jackpot accrued by $5,000 for each show it went unclaimed).\r\n\r\nWhile both shows exist in their entirety, only the 1970s version has been seen in reruns on Game Show Network. Due to Henry's apparent dissatisfaction with the end product of the 1989 version, the show has not been aired again. ","leadImageMedUrl":null}