Thread: Radio causing us to forget music of the past?

  • avatar
    • 4 years 7 months ago
    • Posts: 7014
    The most shocking story about corporate owned radio stations I know is the 2002 Minot, North Dakota train derailment, just outside of town.

    Thousands of gallons of ammonia, for fertilizer, spilled near a neighborhood. Residence called 911 and were told to stay inside and tune all radios to KCJB (AM 910), the designated local emergency broadcast station, for news.

    But KCJB and all the other radio stations near Minot were only broadcasting their usual bland mix of recorded songs, while outside a toxic cloud of ammonia was floating into town.

    Clear Channel owned KCJB and six other radio stations in the area. These stations were all unmanned overnight. Clear Channel replaced locally produced programs with prepackaged content, piped-in from remote studios and transmitted to North Dakota as a digital streaming service.

    Clear Channel said it did nothing wrong. But unless you live in a major media market our nation's emergency response network now has a serious flaw that could leave a lot of people unaware of possible dangerous situations.
    The Eldorado is dead. Long live the Eldorado.
    • avatar
      • 4 years 7 months ago
      • Posts: 2947
      Quote by eddstarr88
      The most shocking story about corporate owned radio stations I know is the 2002 Minot, North Dakota train derailment, just outside of town.

      Thousands of gallons of ammonia, for fertilizer, spilled near a neighborhood. Residence called 911 and were told to stay inside and tune all radios to KCJB (AM 910), the designated local emergency broadcast station, for news.

      But KCJB and all the other radio stations near Minot were only broadcasting their usual bland mix of recorded songs, while outside a toxic cloud of ammonia was floating into town.

      Clear Channel owned KCJB and six other radio stations in the area. These stations were all unmanned overnight. Clear Channel replaced locally produced programs with prepackaged content, piped-in from remote studios and transmitted to North Dakota as a digital streaming service.

      Clear Channel said it did nothing wrong. But unless you live in a major media market our nation's emergency response network now has a serious flaw that could leave a lot of people unaware of possible dangerous situations.


      I remember learning about that incident in mass media class.
      • avatar
        • 4 years 7 months ago
        • Posts: 7014
        Clear Channel is still getting bad press over that incident all these years later. Meanwhile media consolidation continues. This situation has only gotten worse since the Minot accident.
        The Eldorado is dead. Long live the Eldorado.
        • avatar
          • 4 years 7 months ago
          • Posts: 4631
          I remember hearing about that indecent in Minot. I saw similar things here with inclement weather. They were playing music as usual and had their prerecorded DJ's oblivious to what is going down. Even AM talk radio is often times playing a national feed. They would argue that they have EAS, but most only have their EAS to auto activate for governor and the president messages excluding one which is the main EAS " Primary Entry Point" for Houston. Meaning there could be a tornado rampaging through the city and you would not know until it's too late. Before the DJ would break in with realtime information. Furthermore EAS usually isn't activated for things like chemical spills.

          As for their playlist and repeating song because those are the most requested there may be some truth to that. I DJed at a couple of friends parties and everyone wanted to hear the same well known songs. However I have requested a few songs over the years on radio stations and was told "I'll see if I can find that one" and they never played it. Even if it is the result of the public wanting to hear these same songs sometimes people don't know that is best for them. At those parties I DJed at I would have people going wild playing long forgotten songs. A good DJ plays a good variety. Even if you're a pop rock station you should still play a few softer rock songs and classics.

          BTW off topic I remember this girl at work years ago used to always get on one of the local Latino radio stations live. This was before Clear Channel (AKA iHeartMedia) bought them. I'm sure now they have some prerecorded DJ out of Denver that learned Spanish in college.
          • avatar
            • 4 years 6 months ago
            • Posts: 256
            I cringe every time I hear modern music on the radio. It all sounds like the same crap. Luckily, my vehicle supports Sirius XM so I just listen to the 80s station most of the time.
            • avatar
              • 4 years 6 months ago
              • Posts: 1982
              We just came home and Mrs stake turned on the radio while she does homework. I don't know if it's just cause of Halloween weekend or what, but 93.1 WXRT here is playing a really good set of old-school hard rock and garage rock with clearly considered thematic progression put together by a DJ blathering about history stuff and samples of old movies between songs. As I've said I've been done with radio long time, but it seems there are still some in station employ who retain that passion that made things so great back in the day.
              Quote by tangspot2
              Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
              • avatar
                • 4 years 6 months ago
                • Posts: 714
                It bums me out that streaming services are the only way to get a full listening experience. There's two classic rock stations in my town which realistically, have the era of ~1965 to ~1989 to choose from. That's a shit ton of really good and obscure music. I should not hear Pour Some Sugar on Me and Highway to Hell more than four times a week.
                • avatar
                  • 4 years 6 months ago
                  • Posts: 428
                  I am really into 80s music. But unfortunately, where I live, there are only two stations that play 80s music a little bit. And each station plays 90s music on one station and mostly 70s music on the other. Luckily, I have Tunein on the PS3. So, if I really want some 80s tunes, I can go there. But I also love "oldies" music. 40s to the late 60s. But the one single so-called oldies station in town plays mostly 70s music.

                  I guess I'll have to look and see if Tunein has any oldies stations that play Beatles/Buddy Holly music era music.
                  Don't pay any attention to the evil spirited and dead of heart. They're not worth your time.
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