Thread: When did the 80s actually end?

    • 4 years 4 months ago
    • Posts: 41
    Quote by Laddersnake
    Quote by donnie
    The first Home Alone began filming in 1989? Anyways I don't think the first Home Alone has a super 80s or 90s vibe, overall it's definitely seen as a 90s thing but I see it somewhat in between myself. It looked very old during the mid/late 90s, the first one anyways.


    Of course it's not really going to have a strong 80s or 90s vibe. It was at least partly filmed at the end of one decade and released at the beginning of another. As you can probably guess, the most 90s-ish films would probably be filmed around 1994 and released around 1995.


    Yeah 1990 isn't super 80s or super 90s. I would say it's maybe 60% 80s, 40% 90s. 1989-90 is more 90s than I once thought though. "Urban" music was already becoming the standard in 1989. 1990 had MC Hammer and Vanilla Ice who while being "cheesy" and sort of 80s nevertheless marked the beginning of rap music being this super mainstream suburban thing. The albums were made in 1989 and for the most part pre-date gangsta rap but it definitely made the popularity of rap over the 23 years hence more possible.

    I think Home Alone was probably filmed mostly in early-mid 1990 though since it came out very late that year. The script was probably written in 1989, though.

    Same with the first season of Blossom. Despite the show starting in mid-1990 the first season or two of the show has a vibe I would describe as being more 80s than 90s, since it was filmed only a few months after the 80s expired from the calendar.

    Also Lizzie McGuire began filming in the year 2000 and I often see teenage kids describing it as a "90s show". It started airing in January 2001 and most of the episodes were made no later than 2002 so I can see how people would think it's 90s if they were only about 5 or whatever in 2001.

    Especially considering very little changed aesthetically between say 1998 and 2003.
    • avatar
      • 4 years 4 months ago
      • Posts: 1973
      We can pick and choose little bits out of the zeitgeist to relay our own experiences, but The 1980s actually began on January 1, 1980, and actually ended on December 31, 1989.

      The question is incredibly reductive and has no other answer that can be considered correct.

      Pop culture encompasses music, movies, and television, as well as fashion, comic books, and toys. On top of pop culture, there are more things that define time periods, such as politics, cars, architecture, and food trends. None of these things shifted at the same time.

      To be all-inclusive with this question is not possible.
      Quote by tangspot2
      Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
      • avatar
        • 4 years 4 months ago
        • Posts: 18
        Quote by stake
        We can pick and choose little bits out of the zeitgeist to relay our own experiences, but The 1980s actually began on January 1, 1980, and actually ended on December 31, 1989.

        The question is incredibly reductive and has no other answer that can be considered correct.

        Pop culture encompasses music, movies, and television, as well as fashion, comic books, and toys. On top of pop culture, there are more things that define time periods, such as politics, cars, architecture, and food trends. None of these things shifted at the same time.

        To be all-inclusive with this question is not possible.


        Your comments can be a burden on Retrojunk's shoulders.
        • avatar
          • 4 years 4 months ago
          • Posts: 1973
          Quote by Retrojunk_Dentist
          Your comments can be a burden on Retrojunk's shoulders.

          How do you know this, new member? What familiarity do you have with my comments? Have you been lurking for many moons?

          I feel I made an articulate point, there. If you disagree, I am completely willing to read about why that is or why I am "wrong". Educate me!


          :waits:
          Quote by tangspot2
          Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
          • avatar
            • 4 years 4 months ago
            • Posts: 36
            Quote by mlauzon
            IMHO, the '80s -- at least the styles, and music -- ended around '91/'92.


            Agreed, that's my assessment too. To me the 1980's truly started when the USA took the Gold in hockey and it petered out in 1992. I guess it is different for each of us. The 90's to me ended on 9/11 in 2001. The 1970's, I was a kid then, but I think they really started to take their own identity around 1972 or so when the Vietnam War was starting to wind down big time, Watergate started to get legs and people started to chill from the hectic 1960's. Even so, there is overlap, economically, we didn't pull out of the 1970's until about 1982 or so.
            • avatar
              • 4 years 4 months ago
              • Posts: 473
              Quote by Retrojunk_Dentist

              Your comments can be a burden on Retrojunk's shoulders.


              That makes exactly ZERO sense.
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              • avatar
                • 4 years 4 months ago
                • Posts: 1973
                Perhaps Retrojunk_Dentist meant to write:

                "Your comments can be a burden on Retrojunk_Dentist's shoulders."
                Quote by tangspot2
                Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
                • avatar
                  • 4 years 3 months ago
                  • Posts: 288
                  I was born in 1986 so I definitely didn't experience the 80s to its full potential and don't even remember the 80s. However, once I was like 5 and 6 in the early 90s I still enjoyed watching all of these awesome 80s movies for the first time. At that age you really have no sense of time so as far as I was concerned it was still the 80s with all the movies I was watching.
                  • avatar
                    • 4 years 3 months ago
                    • Posts: 84
                    Quote by NowhereMan1966
                    Quote by mlauzon
                    IMHO, the '80s -- at least the styles, and music -- ended around '91/'92.


                    Agreed, that's my assessment too. To me the 1980's truly started when the USA took the Gold in hockey and it petered out in 1992. I guess it is different for each of us. The 90's to me ended on 9/11 in 2001. The 1970's, I was a kid then, but I think they really started to take their own identity around 1972 or so when the Vietnam War was starting to wind down big time, Watergate started to get legs and people started to chill from the hectic 1960's. Even so, there is overlap, economically, we didn't pull out of the 1970's until about 1982 or so.


                    In some ways, 1992 reminded me a lot of 2007. XD
                    • avatar
                      • 10 months 4 days ago
                      • Posts: 2
                      The first shift toward the 80's came in 1979 when the first New Wave/Synthpop songs started to appear (such as Pop Muzik, Video Killed the Radio, My Sharona etc) but it wasn't until late 1982 when New Wave hit the mainstream with MTV becoming popular, therefor 1979-82 were still culturally grounded in the 70's. Sure disco may have been dead by 1980 and Ronald Reagan may have taken office in 1981, but there is no denying a strong 70's influence in the early 80's. With 1982 being the transitional year things were already very well defined by 1983. I'd consider 1983 to 1987 to be the "main" 80's. In 1988 things start to go downhill, synthpop/new wave (even though it started to lose popularity after 1985) is pretty much finished by this point and rap music starts to become more and more popular. But this wasn't the end of the 80's, because as most people would agree, 1991 was the the year the 80's ended because of Grunge.

                      So as a Recap:

                      Phase 1, 1979-82 - 70's holdover years, with 80's styles slowly emerging, but not "taken over" yet.

                      Phase 2, 1983-87 - "Main" 80's. The MTV peak, Miami Vice/Wedding Singer-ish years where the 80's culture peaked

                      Phase 3, 1988-91 - "Fringe late 80's" era. Some very slight influences up as late as '94, but the 80's certainly weren't cool past 1991.
                        • 8 months 15 days ago
                        • Posts: 9
                        Quote by Cleveland
                        The first shift toward the 80's came in 1979 when the first New Wave/Synthpop songs started to appear (such as Pop Muzik, Video Killed the Radio, My Sharona etc) but it wasn't until late 1982 when New Wave hit the mainstream with MTV becoming popular, therefor 1979-82 were still culturally grounded in the 70's. Sure disco may have been dead by 1980 and Ronald Reagan may have taken office in 1981, but there is no denying a strong 70's influence in the early 80's. With 1982 being the transitional year things were already very well defined by 1983. I'd consider 1983 to 1987 to be the "main" 80's. In 1988 things start to go downhill, synthpop/new wave (even though it started to lose popularity after 1985) is pretty much finished by this point and rap music starts to become more and more popular. But this wasn't the end of the 80's, because as most people would agree, 1991 was the the year the 80's ended because of Grunge.

                        So as a Recap:

                        Phase 1, 1979-82 - 70's holdover years, with 80's styles slowly emerging, but not "taken over" yet.

                        Phase 2, 1983-87 - "Main" 80's. The MTV peak, Miami Vice/Wedding Singer-ish years where the 80's culture peaked

                        Phase 3, 1988-91 - "Fringe late 80's" era. Some very slight influences up as late as '94, but the 80's certainly weren't cool past 1991.


                        That all seems to hold up. You pointed out that the 80s era could of began as early as 1979 and ended as late as 1991, but how I look at it is that the 90s era could of began as early as 1989 and ended as late as 2001, since we did get the first vestiges of the 90s that year such as the Simpsons, Family Matters, and such. By 1990, more of the first 90s vestiges were emerging such as Mariah Carey and the Fresh Prince of Bel Air, both cornerstone to the 90s. Now as for the 80s era, the first vestiges of the 80s did come about in 1979 such as the Facts of Life which is cornerstone to the 80s and not the 70s. Of course during '78 and '79, the Cars had some of their first hits and they too, are cornerstone to the 80s. I know 1980 might of had some 70s hangover, but that doesn't automatically mean it's part of the 70s. It's part of the 80s just as 1990 is part of the 90s, even though it may have some 80s hangover. I know disco stuck around a little in '80 but by 1981, disco was completely dead, and '81 would only have very little, if any, 70s hangover. '81 is definitely more oriented to the 80s than the 70s, especially with the launch of MTV, which is cornerstone to the 80s. So that's my two cents in.
                          • 8 months 15 days ago
                          • Posts: 9
                          Quote by Cleveland
                          The first shift toward the 80's came in 1979 when the first New Wave/Synthpop songs started to appear (such as Pop Muzik, Video Killed the Radio, My Sharona etc) but it wasn't until late 1982 when New Wave hit the mainstream with MTV becoming popular, therefor 1979-82 were still culturally grounded in the 70's. Sure disco may have been dead by 1980 and Ronald Reagan may have taken office in 1981, but there is no denying a strong 70's influence in the early 80's. With 1982 being the transitional year things were already very well defined by 1983. I'd consider 1983 to 1987 to be the "main" 80's. In 1988 things start to go downhill, synthpop/new wave (even though it started to lose popularity after 1985) is pretty much finished by this point and rap music starts to become more and more popular. But this wasn't the end of the 80's, because as most people would agree, 1991 was the the year the 80's ended because of Grunge.

                          So as a Recap:

                          Phase 1, 1979-82 - 70's holdover years, with 80's styles slowly emerging, but not "taken over" yet.

                          Phase 2, 1983-87 - "Main" 80's. The MTV peak, Miami Vice/Wedding Singer-ish years where the 80's culture peaked

                          Phase 3, 1988-91 - "Fringe late 80's" era. Some very slight influences up as late as '94, but the 80's certainly weren't cool past 1991.


                          That all seems to hold up. You pointed out that the 80s era could of began as early as 1979 and ended as late as 1991, but how I look at it is that the 90s era could of began as early as 1989 and ended as late as 2001, since we did get the first vestiges of the 90s that year such as the Simpsons, Family Matters, and such. By 1990, more of the first 90s vestiges were emerging such as Mariah Carey and the Fresh Prince of Bel Air, both cornerstone to the 90s. Now as for the 80s era, the first vestiges of the 80s did come about in 1979 such as the Facts of Life which is cornerstone to the 80s and not the 70s. Of course during '78 and '79, the Cars had some of their first hits and they too, are cornerstone to the 80s. I know 1980 might of had some 70s hangover, but that doesn't automatically mean it's part of the 70s. It's part of the 80s just as 1990 is part of the 90s, even though it may have some 80s hangover. I know disco stuck around a little in '80 but by 1981, disco was completely dead, and '81 would only have very little, if any, 70s hangover. '81 is definitely more oriented to the 80s than the 70s, especially with the launch of MTV, which is cornerstone to the 80s. So that's my two cents in.
                          • avatar
                            • 8 months 14 days ago
                            • Posts: 183
                            The 80s ended literally in January 1993. It was the signal of the end during the moment George H.W. Bush lost his reelection bid against Bill Clinton in November 1992.

                            Suddenly with the Clintons in office, the news became dominated about sex scandals, Paula Jones, Hillary's hair styles, Hillarycare, Slick Willy, other sex scandal alligations, etc.

                            TV shows started becoming a bit rougher at this time. Right around the end of 1992 was when NBC stopped all Saturday morning cartoons. New phrases entered the American lexicon like "Don't Ask, don't tell" and people loved making fun of Ross Perot's ears and his Texas accent.

                            Fashion really changed in 1993. I used to wear neon colored Umbro shorts at gym class up until then. Suddenly neon was completely out of flavor and more solid colors dominated. Women had ceased to wear puffy shoulder pads, and guys (myself included!!) no longer tight-rolled their pants. That fad may have ended earlier, but here in the midwest it did still linger around until 1992-93.

                            Music REALLY changed on the radio. Grunge was in! Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, NKOTB, and other happier pop music faded away quickly. Most 80s artists struggled to receive airplay in the early 90s. Rap dominated as well. Rap started becoming mainstream in 1990 but it was everywhere by 1993. Even Madonna drastically changed her style once her Immaculate Collection came out and became so much rougher. She released her Sex book at this time too, and her early 90s songs are definitely not as catchier as the ones that made her famous in the 80s. Madonna movies went from happy flicks like "Who's that Girl" and "Desperately Seeking Susan" from the 80s to "Body of Evidence" in 1993 which attempted to portray her as a sex symbol.

                            I could go on and on, but I was about 11 in 1992 and I distinctly remember a different feeling in 1993 and onward. Politics really had something to do with it as it had been 12 years since a Democratic President.
                              • 8 months 11 days ago
                              • Posts: 9
                              Quote by Retrojunk_Dentist
                              Quote by stake
                              We can pick and choose little bits out of the zeitgeist to relay our own experiences, but The 1980s actually began on January 1, 1980, and actually ended on December 31, 1989.

                              The question is incredibly reductive and has no other answer that can be considered correct.

                              Pop culture encompasses music, movies, and television, as well as fashion, comic books, and toys. On top of pop culture, there are more things that define time periods, such as politics, cars, architecture, and food trends. None of these things shifted at the same time.

                              To be all-inclusive with this question is not possible.


                              Your comments can be a burden on Retrojunk's shoulders.


                              :wink:agree 100%
                                • 8 months 11 days ago
                                • Posts: 9
                                Quote by Retrojunk_Dentist
                                Quote by stake
                                We can pick and choose little bits out of the zeitgeist to relay our own experiences, but The 1980s actually began on January 1, 1980, and actually ended on December 31, 1989.

                                The question is incredibly reductive and has no other answer that can be considered correct.

                                Pop culture encompasses music, movies, and television, as well as fashion, comic books, and toys. On top of pop culture, there are more things that define time periods, such as politics, cars, architecture, and food trends. None of these things shifted at the same time.

                                To be all-inclusive with this question is not possible.


                                Your comments can be a burden on Retrojunk's shoulders.


                                You are most definitely correct the 80s ended when the clock struck midnight January 1, 1990. Now it would be fair to say that 1990 could of had some 80s hangover, but that doesn't automatically mean it's part of the 80s. It's part of the 90s, just like 1970 is part of the 70s, 1980 is part of the 80s, and 2000 is part of the 2000s. The aforementioned years may have some hangover of the previous decade but it doesn't automatically mean it's part of that very decade. You and I know decadeology better than everyone else on this thread.
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