• avatar
    • 2 years 3 months ago
    • Posts: 10111
    retroman wrote:
    eddstarr88 wrote:
    One of the most fun episodes of "Siskel & Ebert" I ever saw was a tutorial on Film Plot Types.

    I've been trying to find that clip on YouTube, but the show went something like this:

    The Idiot Plot: A plot that requires all the characters to be idiots. If they weren't, they'd immediately figure out everything and the movie would be over.

    The Buddy Cop Plot: two people, usually opposites of each other with conflicting personalities, are forced to work together.


    Those are the two I can remember. Maybe other members can find the rest of the list because according to Roger Ebert every movie ever made falls into one of these universal movie plot types.


    Is Rush Hour considered a Buddy Cop

    The main characters didn't get along at first, but they did later on in the movie.
    thecrow174: Lover of martial arts cinema.
    Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
    • avatar
      • 2 years 3 months ago
      • Posts: 1917
      The buddy movie is usually what Ebert called a "wunza movie."

      Roger Ebert wrote:
      Any film using a plot which can be summarized by saying "One's a..." For example, "One's a cop. One's an actor." Or "One's a saint. One's a sinner."
      tangspot2 wrote:
      Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
      Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
      • avatar
        • 2 years 3 months ago
        • Posts: 7002
        stake n sheak wrote:
        The buddy movie is usually what Ebert called a "wunza movie."

        Roger Ebert wrote:
        Any film using a plot which can be summarized by saying "One's a..." For example, "One's a cop. One's an actor." Or "One's a saint. One's a sinner."



        YES! A funny take on the promo line used in the 80's.

        And the "Buddy Cop" formula can be action/adventure or a comedy.
        The Eldorado is dead. Long live the Eldorado.
        Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
          • 2 years 3 months ago
          • Posts: 702
          • Globally Banned
          stake n sheak wrote:
          It's an interesting concept. Depending on who you ask, the number of plot types varies greatly. When I was in grade school, I was taught there are three:
          Man vs Man - conflict between people
          Man vs Nature - conflict between a person and the world or environment (i.e., monster movies, or climbing a mountain)
          Man vs Himself - internal conflict or struggle
          It's the unique elements that make a story interesting and new, but all stories can be reduced down to one of these simple styles.


          Other schools of thought extrapolate this basic framework and say there are seven:
          Man vs Man
          Man vs Nature
          Man vs Environment
          Man vs Machines and Technology
          Man vs The Supernatural
          Man vs Himself
          Man vs God/Religion

          I don't agree with this. All of those can be put into the three containers, although combinations are possible (and again, are what makes things interesting.) 'vs God/Religion', for instance, could be seen as 'vs Man' and/or 'vs Nature'.

          Yet more categorizations count more types of plot, with themes such as:
          Quest
          Adventure
          Pursuit
          Rescue
          Escape
          Revenge

          (and more.) This is from Ronald Tobias's 20 Master Plots. Again, while deeper studies may use this classification system to reveal intricate ideas of story construction, I see a lot of overlap between these.

          or:
          Deliverance
          Crime Pursued by Vengeance
          Vengeance taken for kindred upon kindred
          Pursuit
          Disaster
          Falling Prey to Cruelty of Misfortune
          Revolt

          (and more.) Georges Polti's The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations.)


          Opposites attract two different people fall in love despite social racial or political differences
          Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
          Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
            • 2 years 3 months ago
            • Posts: 3
            Hello friends. It's me. Thank you for all of your kind words. I'm watching movies in Heaven now.

            I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have for me.
            Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
            • avatar
              • 2 years 3 months ago
              • Posts: 10111
              Roger Ebert wrote:
              Hello friends. It's me. Thank you for all of your kind words. I'm watching movies in Heaven now.

              I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have for me.

              So disrespectful.
              thecrow174: Lover of martial arts cinema.
              Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                • 2 years 3 months ago
                • Posts: 702
                • Globally Banned
                Roger Ebert wrote:
                Hello friends. It's me. Thank you for all of your kind words. I'm watching movies in Heaven now.

                I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have for me.


                Tell me your favorite non disney cartoon movies from the 90's
                Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                • avatar
                  • 2 years 3 months ago
                  • Posts: 7002
                  Yeah, that's what I'm talking about retroman. On "Siskel & Ebert" there was an entire episode on movie plots and the idea was that there are no completely new film ideas anymore. Every movie falls into one of those plot categories you listed.

                  My personal favorite is what Roger Ebert called,

                  The Fish Outta Water Plot: the main character is placed in a world totally foreign to the one he or she is accustomed to.

                  A prime example is Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd in "Trading Places" from 1983.
                  The Eldorado is dead. Long live the Eldorado.
                  Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                    • 2 years 3 months ago
                    • Posts: 3
                    Well retroman, there unfortunately weren't many that I enjoyed. But here are a few: Bebe's Kids. The Tune. The Wrong Trousers. And Beavis and Butt-Head Do America.
                    Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                      • 2 years 3 months ago
                      • Posts: 702
                      • Globally Banned
                      eddstarr88 wrote:
                      Yeah, that's what I'm talking about retroman. On "Siskel & Ebert" there was an entire episode on movie plots and the idea was that there are no completely new film ideas anymore. Every movie falls into one of those plot categories you listed.

                      My personal favorite is what Roger Ebert called,

                      The Fish Outta Water Plot: the main character is placed in a world totally foreign to the one he or she is accustomed to.

                      A prime example is Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd in "Trading Places" from 1983.


                      Or Enchanted since i think i remembering hearing Ebert was a fan of that movie and he praised Amy Adam's performance
                      Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                      Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                        • 2 years 3 months ago
                        • Posts: 702
                        • Globally Banned
                        Roger Ebert wrote:
                        Well retroman, there unfortunately weren't many that I enjoyed. But here are a few: Bebe's Kids. The Tune. The Wrong Trousers. And Beavis and Butt-Head Do America.


                        I saw your review for Thumbelina and i disagreed with both of you, it was a great movie and i became a fan of Jodi Benson because of that movie
                        Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                        Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                        • avatar
                          • 2 years 3 months ago
                          • Posts: 1917
                          eddstarr88 wrote:
                          ...there are no completely new film ideas anymore...

                          I'll always remember learning in film class, that both Star Wars and Rashomon are "westerns".
                          tangspot2 wrote:
                          Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
                          Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                            • 2 years 3 months ago
                            • Posts: 702
                            • Globally Banned
                            Roger Ebert wrote:
                            Well retroman, there unfortunately weren't many that I enjoyed. But here are a few: Bebe's Kids. The Tune. The Wrong Trousers. And Beavis and Butt-Head Do America.


                            Meanwhile i agreed with your Little Princess review since it was one of the best movies of the 90's period
                            Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                            Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                              • 2 years 3 months ago
                              • Posts: 702
                              • Globally Banned
                              stake n sheak wrote:
                              eddstarr88 wrote:
                              ...there are no completely new film ideas anymore...

                              I'll always remember learning in film class, that both Star Wars and Rashomon are "westerns".


                              We all want something fresh once in a while
                              Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                              Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                              • avatar
                                • 2 years 3 months ago
                                • Posts: 1917
                                Roger Ebert wrote:
                                I'll be happy to answer any questions you might have for me.
                                [/color]

                                What was your opinion of Ralph Bakshi?
                                tangspot2 wrote:
                                Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
                                Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                                  • 2 years 3 months ago
                                  • Posts: 3
                                  thecrow174, I have great respect for everyone here. If my presence makes you uncomfortable, I am very sorry. Perhaps this was not the right place for me to reach out to a community of film lovers in my rest.

                                  Thank you retroman. I'm glad you enjoyed A Little Princess too.

                                  stake n sheak, I found Mr. Bakshi to be quite provocative and original in his earlier years. Some of his later work, however, was surprisingly incompetent.
                                  Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                                  • avatar
                                    • 2 years 3 months ago
                                    • Posts: 7002
                                    stake n sheak wrote:
                                    eddstarr88 wrote:
                                    ...there are no completely new film ideas anymore...

                                    I'll always remember learning in film class, that both Star Wars and Rashomon are "westerns".



                                    That's cool! Steven Spielberg often compares sci-fi films as "westerns with a weapon upgrade".
                                    The Eldorado is dead. Long live the Eldorado.
                                    Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                                      • 2 years 3 months ago
                                      • Posts: 702
                                      • Globally Banned
                                      Roger Ebert wrote:
                                      thecrow174, I have great respect for everyone here. If my presence makes you uncomfortable, I am very sorry. Perhaps this was not the right place for me to reach out to a community of film lovers in my rest.

                                      Thank you retroman.

                                      stake n sheak, I found Mr. Bakshi to be quite provocative and original in his earlier years. Some of his later work, however, was surprisingly incompetent.


                                      Farewell mr Ebert you were an inspiration for all of us
                                      Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                                      Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                                        • 2 years 3 months ago
                                        • Posts: 702
                                        • Globally Banned
                                        Roger Ebert wrote:
                                        thecrow174, I have great respect for everyone here. If my presence makes you uncomfortable, I am very sorry. Perhaps this was not the right place for me to reach out to a community of film lovers in my rest.

                                        Thank you retroman.

                                        stake n sheak, I found Mr. Bakshi to be quite provocative and original in his earlier years. Some of his later work, however, was surprisingly incompetent.


                                        By the way let's talk some more next time
                                        Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                                        Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                                          • 2 years 3 months ago
                                          • Posts: 702
                                          • Globally Banned
                                          eddstarr88 wrote:
                                          stake n sheak wrote:
                                          eddstarr88 wrote:
                                          ...there are no completely new film ideas anymore...

                                          I'll always remember learning in film class, that both Star Wars and Rashomon are "westerns".



                                          That's cool! Steven Spielberg often compares sci-fi films as "westerns with a weapon upgrade".


                                          I don't do Westerns
                                          Hoping to explore pop culture from the 20th Century with you
                                          Are you sure you want to delete this post? Yes | No
                                          Search