• 1 year 6 months ago
    • Posts: 3807
    Hi all. I've been super busy the last couple of weeks because I have been teaching at an inner city school in CT. This incident has affected me and my colleagues profoundly. We face the threat of school violence everyday, more often than not from the students we teach... But this is a whole new brand of violence. Where random strangers or parents or employees can access the school and unleash chaos.

    Every school in this state has emergency procedures in place for these types of incidents. I have practiced lock-downs with my students as well as fire drills and evacuations. I have no doubt that these procedures saved many lives at Sandy Hook Elementary, and unfortunately the people caught in the initial crossfire could not be saved by these drills because there is no procedure for break-ins and unreasonable armed persons. (And there is certainly no procedure for dealing with the aftermath with our students.) Even with our security guard and locked doors, this could still happen at my school. And that is partly why the city police department has been patrolling our school ever since Friday.

    Not only will tomorrow be my last day at this position, it will also be the day we observe a moment of silence for the victims and acknowledge the incident formally. And yet again I am back to looking for work in the education field, but this, more than anything else I have been through over the last few years, has definitely made me question whether or not to stay in this line of work. It is not so much for my own safety- the majority of teachers think only of their students and their ability to protect them. This was one of those times when we were completely helpless to do so. Hopefully we never experience it again.

    My heart is broken over this. I didn't find out until late in the day, mostly because my cell phone was dead, but I cried all the way home.

    vkimo wrote:
    If anything, I think increasing a person's gun rights might do better. A person would think twice going on a shooting rampage if they know everyone else is packing heat too.


    This is a completely ridiculous sentiment. The people who commit mass murders such as these, more often than not are extremely mentally disturbed and would not bat an eyelash at the thought of getting killed in the process. The majority of them end up killing themselves in the end.

    This issue is not about guns, it is about the NECESSITY of access to healthcare, which includes mental healthcare. I, for one, have not been able to see someone about my issues since college and it has reached a breaking point. I don't know how much longer I can go on like this, considering my financial situation has not improved to the point where I can afford it myself. Healthcare reform should've happened ages ago. I wonder if this young man experienced something similar and had no support system around him to prevent his downward spiral.
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      • 1 year 6 months ago
      • Posts: 2192
      • Forum Mod
      • Editor
      Yeah, I admit my statement was pretty much bologna. What I meant was, if one properly trained, rational person had a firearm on them things may have been a little different, again maybe.
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        • 1 year 6 months ago
        • Posts: 4514
        Despite bullying kids are safer in school than they are at home. Even if there was a mass shooting every year or a kid was killed everyday, schools would still be safer. This of course doesn't help the few whose kids die at school. As with anything we must outweigh the risk, cost and benefits. Is it in our kids best interest to make our schools into prisons to avoid something that will likely never happen?

        Here in Texas most of the larger school districts have their own police department. At least one officers is assigned to each high school and usually the middle schools as well. They patrol the elementary school and respond quickly if there is a problem. This avoids the local police being bothered or having to be contracted by the district.

        The installation of panic buttons and possibly gun shot detectors would be a good long tern plan to help protect schools. Security at every school is another option, but again is it cost effective and couldn't a single guard be easily taken out?

        While the last two mass shootings were done with assault rifles most are not. Banning them will not stop them from happening. Furthermore a total ban on guns will not stop them because there are too many guns out there. Finally just about anyone can make home made bombs which can do a lot of damage.
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          • 1 year 6 months ago
          • Posts: 619
          People tend to forget all the bombs planted in Columbine, thanks for mentioning that. Why doesn't anyone mention how many scho shootings are prevented every year.
          One kid planned on shooting up my class in High School back in 2002. I skipped that day and another girl told the administrator and he was caught with a .45 on him. He was crazy and bullied his whole life but it never made the local news or anything. I'm sure it happens way more often than people think but it's hidden from the news to make people think their kids are safe and in no danger.
          Free Lil Boosie
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