• 1 year 7 months ago
    • Posts: 164
    Korreck.

    I'm a Polish-American and I told my wife that all names that end with an "ek", or an "eck", are usually Polish, or at least Eastern European. She disagreed with me and said "Korreck" is NOT a Polish name. :?

    All help will be appreciated. :)

    Thanks !

    Cheers !

    Sincerely,

    Steve B. :D
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      • 1 year 7 months ago
      • Posts: 1630
      http://genealogy.about.com/cs/surname/a/polish_surnames.htm wrote:
      Geographical Surnames (Place Names) - The most common type of Polish surname, these Polish last names are derived from the location of the homestead from which the first bearer and his family lived. In the case of nobility, the surnames were often taken from the names of their estates. Other place names which were adapted into surnames include towns, countries, and even geographical features. While you might think that such surnames could lead you to your ancestral village, that isn't often the case with Polish surnames because so many places in Poland had the same name, changed names or disappeared in the centuries since the surnames developed, or were subdivisions of a local village or estate too small to be found on a gazetteer or map. Surnames ending in -owski usually derive from place names ending in -y, -ow, -owo, -owa, and so on. (Cyrek Gryzbowski - Cyrek from the town of Gryzbow).

      Patronymic & Matronymic Surnames - Based on an ancestor's first name, this category of surnames is usually derived from a father's first name, although occasionally from the first name of a wealthy or well-respected female ancestor. Such surnames can often be identified through the use certain endings including -icz, -wicz, -owicz, -ewicz, and -ycz which usually mean "son of." As a rule, Polish surnames which include a suffix with -k- (-czak, -czyk, -iak, -ak, -ik, and -yk) also mean something like "little" or "son of." More commonly found in eastern Poland, the suffixes -yc and -ic also mean "son of." There are also cases of patronymic surnames where the ending has been dropped and only the original root word remains. (Pawel Adamicz - Paul son of Adam).

      Occupational Surnames - these Polish last names are based on the person's job or trade (Micha³ Krawiec - Michael the tailor).

      Descriptive Surnames - Based on a unique quality or physical feature of the individual, these surnames often developed from nicknames or pet names (Jan Wysocki - John the tall).



      Korreck is a little similar, not much, to the patrynomic and occupational styles. If it is Polish it is very heavily americanized. All the surname databases I can find do not know this name.
      tangspot2 wrote:
      Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
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        • 1 year 7 months ago
        • Posts: 164
        "stake and sheak"...Thank you for the fascinating and thorough research. "Korreck" sounds Polish to me, but like you said, it could have been "Americanized" throughout the decades.

        How about Polish surnames that end with "ski?" Doesn't "ski" mean "son of", as well ?

        Cheers ! :)
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          • 1 year 7 months ago
          • Posts: 1630
          You're welcome! I really enjoy etymology, especially of names.

          The page says those names usually derive from places. I'm not Polish so I don't know or have many examples, but I do have a Polish friend "Jablonski" which means: One who lived by an apple tree or apple orchard, or a grower or seller of apples, from the Polish root jablon, meaning "apple tree."

          I suppose it could also be taken as "son of the apple orchard" if translated a certain way but it seems this will generally be a place rather than a person. -sson and -sdottir surname suffixes, in the Icelandic language, mean 'son of' and 'daughter of' and refer to the parent; but the Polish -ski* does not appear to work that way.

          * the feminine form is -ska, but that seems to be an old fashion and not common now
          tangspot2 wrote:
          Mrs. stake you say some nasty on my threads. Dirty bitch
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            • 1 year 7 months ago
            • Posts: 164
            "stake n sheak"...Thanks for the info ! I remember learning from several sources throughout the years: ("word of mouth" conversations,"hard copy" articles, etc.) that "ski" supposedly meant "son of" in the Polish language. Even my parents said this was the case all of their lives and they both grew up in a Polish neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan ('30's, 40's and early '50's). However, I guess all of these sources were wrong. :(

            Thanks for clearing things up. :D

            Cheers ! :)
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              • 1 year 7 months ago
              • Posts: 164
              stake n sheak wrote:
              http://genealogy.about.com/cs/surname/a/polish_surnames.htm wrote:
              Geographical Surnames (Place Names) - The most common type of Polish surname, these Polish last names are derived from the location of the homestead from which the first bearer and his family lived. In the case of nobility, the surnames were often taken from the names of their estates. Other place names which were adapted into surnames include towns, countries, and even geographical features. While you might think that such surnames could lead you to your ancestral village, that isn't often the case with Polish surnames because so many places in Poland had the same name, changed names or disappeared in the centuries since the surnames developed, or were subdivisions of a local village or estate too small to be found on a gazetteer or map. Surnames ending in -owski usually derive from place names ending in -y, -ow, -owo, -owa, and so on. (Cyrek Gryzbowski - Cyrek from the town of Gryzbow).

              Patronymic & Matronymic Surnames - Based on an ancestor's first name, this category of surnames is usually derived from a father's first name, although occasionally from the first name of a wealthy or well-respected female ancestor. Such surnames can often be identified through the use certain endings including -icz, -wicz, -owicz, -ewicz, and -ycz which usually mean "son of." As a rule, Polish surnames which include a suffix with -k- (-czak, -czyk, -iak, -ak, -ik, and -yk) also mean something like "little" or "son of." More commonly found in eastern Poland, the suffixes -yc and -ic also mean "son of." There are also cases of patronymic surnames where the ending has been dropped and only the original root word remains. (Pawel Adamicz - Paul son of Adam).

              Occupational Surnames - these Polish last names are based on the person's job or trade (Micha³ Krawiec - Michael the tailor).

              Descriptive Surnames - Based on a unique quality or physical feature of the individual, these surnames often developed from nicknames or pet names (Jan Wysocki - John the tall).



              Korreck is a little similar, not much, to the patrynomic and occupational styles. If it is Polish it is very heavily americanized. All the surname databases I can find do not know this name.
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