• 3 years 8 months ago
    • Posts: 1068
    This has been a major debate for many. The people who have listened to Peter Gabriel Genesis would NOT listen to Phil Collins Genesis and the people who have listened to Phil Collins Genesis would NOT listen to Peter Gabriel Genesis.

    I, myself, like both! The Phil Collins Genesis took over where Peter Gabriel Genesis left off, but as the 70's passed by...they became more poppier because if they didn't...Genesis would probably have disappeared.

    Also, Phil Collins DID pull-off sounding like Peter Gabriel and he (Collins) kept most of the songs Gabriel sang such as "The Knife"...though the song got cut in half after Gabriel left and "The Musical Box" which was the end of a few Gabriel-era Genesis songs such as "Moonlight Knight" and "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway".

    And BOTH Gabriel Genesis and Collins Genesis DID have duds...in the Gabriel Genesis, it was "From Genesis to Revelation" and "Tresspass" (with the exception of "The Knife") and in the Collins Genesis, it was "Illegal Alien" and "Jesus he knows Me".

    And the 1996 "Calling All Stations" Genesis does NOT count...there was no true lead singer at the time!
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      • 3 years 8 months ago
      • Posts: 534
      I love them both, but I'm certainly more partial towards Phil Collins, namely because I like more of his solo work.
      Garfield: "My car is so old, that it's insured against theft, flood, fire and dinosaur stampedes!"

      Garfield: "The local bus transit is doing their part to help with the weight loss program: each year, they stop further and further away from the curb!
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        • 3 years 8 months ago
        • Posts: 728
        • Account Disabled
        Trespass isn't a dud to me at all. It's actually one of my favorite Genesis albums. I like everything from the first album, From Genesis to Revelations up to Abacab. After that I only like a couple of songs, Just a Job to do off '83's Genesis, the extended 12 inch remix of Tonight Tonight Tonight, On the Shorline which is an outtake from We Can't Dance and the '99 version of Carpet Crawlers which was a nice closer to Genesis' career and features vocals from both Gabriel and Collins.
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          • 3 years 8 months ago
          • Posts: 136
          Easily Phil Collins, with Genesis or not, anybody that gets hit-single status from a song entitled "Shock The Monkey" should be castrated in my book.
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            • 3 years 8 months ago
            • Posts: 719
            Phil Collins Genesis, but Peter Gabriel solo in my book.
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              • 3 years 8 months ago
              • Posts: 1068
              One_Louder wrote:
              Trespass isn't a dud to me at all. It's actually one of my favorite Genesis albums. I like everything from the first album, From Genesis to Revelations up to Abacab. After that I only like a couple of songs, Just a Job to do off '83's Genesis, the extended 12 inch remix of Tonight Tonight Tonight, On the Shorline which is an outtake from We Can't Dance and the '99 version of Carpet Crawlers which was a nice closer to Genesis' career and features vocals from both Gabriel and Collins.


              I kinda like the pre-Phil Collins Genesis, but it was when Phil Collins became the drummer and they had Steve Hackett after Anthony Phillips left because of Stage Fright.

              PS-Collins got the gig by listening to the previous drummers as well as probably listening to their album "Tresspass", in which I said before was played live until 1980 with Collins singing the song "The Knife".
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                • 3 years 8 months ago
                • Posts: 397
                gabriel
                [quote]
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                  • 1 year 5 days ago
                  • Posts: 101
                  I've always like both.
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                    • 8 months 21 days ago
                    • Posts: 697
                    Genesis is one of my top bands of all time. People act surprised when I tell them, but their catalog is so diverse and layered. Picking an era is like choosing a favorite pizza topping, it's all good even if some parts don't quite belong. If pressed though, I tend to go back to the first 2-3 albums with Collins on vocals.
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                      • 8 months 21 days ago
                      • Posts: 2344
                      • Forum Mod
                      • Editor
                      I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to Land of Confusion. In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. In Too Deep is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like In the Air Tonight and Against All Odds. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is Sussudio, a great, great song, a personal favorite.
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                        • 8 months 19 days ago
                        • Posts: 697
                        vkimo wrote:
                        I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to Land of Confusion. In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. In Too Deep is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like In the Air Tonight and Against All Odds. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is Sussudio, a great, great song, a personal favorite.


                        Thanks for the un-cited American Psycho quote.
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