• 3 years 6 months ago
    • Posts: 709
    Is there any proof that the production technique that Phil Spector had used on records by the artists he produced for in the 1960s (The Ronettes, The Righteous Brothers, The Crystals, The Beatles/John Lennon, etc.) had influenced the 1970s progressive-rock sound?

    In other words, I don't believe prog-rock as we knew it (Yes, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, King Crimson, Genesis, Kansas, Supertramp, Rush, etc.) would've existed had it not been for this oft-reclusive producer and Lana Clarkson murderer's production technique.

    ~Ben
    "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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      • 3 years 6 months ago
      • Posts: 682
      There's maybe a small group of prog musicians that appreciated pop production, but for the most part the complete opposite is true. The biggest inspiration for a lot of those bands was classical and jazz...and each other.

      I don't hear a "wall-of-sound" listening to Yes, Camel, Pink Floyd, Genesis or King Crimson. Phil Spector's technique was to blow up a simple arrangement into a fluffy, reverbed, layered slice of pop perfection (and succeeded).
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        • 2 years 8 months ago
        • Posts: 709
        The closest album I can think of that melds the "Wall of Sound" sound with prog-rock was the Electric Light Orchestra's 1981 album, Time (particularly on the song "The Way Life's Meant to Be".)
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJCq2enroa8

        ~Ben
        "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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