• 5 years 3 months ago
    • Posts: 709
    How many of you believe the people who compiled up this list?

    http://www.shoutmouth.com/index.php/news/Rolling_Stone_Names_Its_Top_20_Rip-Off_Songs

    I do believe them well in regards to Vanilla Ice's "Ice Ice Baby" (1990) borrowing from Queen & David Bowie's "Under Pressure" (1982), although I must say that while Joss Stone's White Stripes cover "Fell in Love with a Boy" (2003) (for which its singer, Jack White, had inexplicitly adopted as his own recently) and David Bowie's final #1 U.S. hit, "Let's Dance" (1983) are not exactly rip-offs, the basic pop/R&B/soul influences heard on both songs, however, are (Joss Stone's guitarist does some Stevie Ray Vaughan-type guitar licks).

    Although Boston's 1976 hit "More Than a Feeling" did inspire the musical underpinnings to Nirvana's 1991 hit "Smells Like Teen Spirit," Boston's song itself seemed to be derived partly from that of Cream's 1969 hit "Badge" (that song was written by Eric Clapton with George Harrison after Clapton had previously played on the Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" the year before; the two men had both fallen for Pattie Boyd, who was married to Harrison from 1966-77 and to Clapton from 1979-88).

    Other candidates for rip-offs/soundalikes:
    1. Kylie Minogue's "Love at First Sight" (2002) vs. Evelyn "Champagne" King's "Love Come Down" (1982)
    2. Savage Garden's "I Knew I Loved You" (1999) vs. Britney Spears' "Sometimes" (1998) (though that didn't stop the former from reaching #1 on the charts)
    3. Stacy Keibler's "Why Can't We Just Dance?" (2004) vs. Willa Ford's "I Wanna Be Bad" (2001) - hear all the vocoders and synthesizers!
    4. Ambrosia's "How Can You Love Me" (1982) vs. Evelyn "Champagne" King's "Shame" (1977)
    5. The Rolling Stones' "Anybody Seen My Baby?" (1997) vs. k.d. lang's "Constant Craving" (1992) - the comparisons between the two were wisecracked by Stones guitarist Keith Richards' oldest daughter, Angela (nee Dandelion) after hearing both.
    6. Harold Faltermeyer's "Axel F" (1985) vs. Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" (1983)
    7. Usher, Li'l Jon and Ludacris' "Yeah!" (2004) vs. Harold Faltermeyer's "Axel F" (1985)
    8. Billy Joel's "You're Only Human (Second Wind)" (1985) vs. Natalie Cole's "(This Will Be an) Everlasting Love" (1975)
    9. Various songs from Sonic the Hedgehog 3 resembling various Michael Jackson songs
    10. k.d. lang's "Constant Craving" (1992) vs. Basia Trzetrzelewska's "Cruising for Bruising" (1990)

    ~Ben
    "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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      • 5 years 3 months ago
      • Posts: 534
      ^That's a good one! And speaking of Ray Parker, Jr., his hit with Raydio "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)" from 1981 sounds eerily similar to New Edition's hit "Mr. Telephone Man" from 1984.
      Garfield: "My car is so old, that it's insured against theft, flood, fire and dinosaur stampedes!"

      Garfield: "The local bus transit is doing their part to help with the weight loss program: each year, they stop further and further away from the curb!
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        • 5 years 3 months ago
        • Posts: 709
        retroguy78 wrote:
        Don't forget "I Want A New Drug" vs. "Ghostbusters", though I like both songs a lot.

        Oh yeah, although you may also want to drop in both songs' comparisons to that of M's 1979 #1 hit "Pop Muzik" and that of Kool & the Gang's 1981 #1, "Celebration." (EDIT 6-10-2012: The 1967 hit "Soul Finger" by the Bar-Kays is also added to this comparison list.)

        Although this may not be too much of a rip-off, Richard Ashcroft, singer of the British band the Verve, initially took up negotiations with ABKCO Music (ABKCO meaning Allen & Betty Klein and Company; its founder Allen Klein had passed away from Alzheimer's disease this past July at age 77; also the same age that the last senior Kennedy son, Ted, died at the month after), for their song "Bittersweet Symphony," to sample part of the Rolling Stones' 1965 hit "The Last Time" (in the case of the Verve, the recording used was that of the Andrew Oldham Orchestra version). Klein managed the Stones from 1965-70.

        But after hearing the finished song and its supposed success in sales, however, Klein argued that too much of the sample was used, with all the publishing rights going back to his label and the songwriting credits to the song's originators, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (when the song was nominated for a Grammy Award, said members were named nominees of the song and not the Verve). Said fellow Verve member Simon Jones: "We were told it was going to be a 50/50 split, and then they noticed how well the record was doing. They rung up and said 'we want 100% or pull it off the record shelves,' you don't have much choice." Andrew Oldham himself, who'd also managed the Stones (from 1963-67), also asked for royalties from EMI (the Verve's record label) over the song.

        Since losing status as the song's writer, Ashcroft had said: "This is the best song Jagger and Richards have written in 20 years." (sic). Sorry, Mr. Ashcroft: the best song Jagger and Richards have written in 32 years." (1965 + 32 = 1997) NOTE: Actually, Ashcroft meant the "20 years" thing to take note that "Bittersweet" was the biggest hit the Stones had since the 1971 hit "Brown Sugar," but you still get the gist of it, right?

        Another noted roundup: George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord" (1970) vs. The Chiffons' "He's So Fine" (1963). This was another Allen Klein involvement, although he hadn't been Harrison's manager at the time when he sued the former Beatles guitarist over copyright infringement over his song sounding like the other one in 1976. The Chiffons ended up covering "My Sweet Lord" in response to the controversy.

        In his own defense, George Harrison wrote a song that same year called "This Song," its lyrics reminding the listener, "This tune has nothing Bright about it." The lyrics also reference other '60s songs such as "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)" and "Rescue Me." Its video, first shown on the 11/20/76 episode of Saturday Night Live, features Eric Idle (singing the "Rescue Me" falsetto), Ron Wood (a Pepperpot character) and Jim Keltner (the Judge).

        After having noticed during the onset of the lawsuit that Klein bought out Bright Tunes (the original publisher of the Chiffons' tune), Harrison later had countersued him and, as a result of breach of trust, was awarded the copyright for the 1963 song and didn't have to pay the $6 million Klein had wanted over it. It's ironic Harrison now owned the rights to both songs.

        ~Ben
        "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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          • 5 years 3 months ago
          • Posts: 709
          princess_of_power wrote:
          ^That's a good one! And speaking of Ray Parker, Jr., his hit with Raydio "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)" from 1981 sounds eerily similar to New Edition's hit "Mr. Telephone Man" from 1984.


          Heck, Parker, Jr. even composed it.
          "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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            • 5 years 3 months ago
            • Posts: 563
            How about:

            Prince - 1999 Vs Phil Collins - Sussidio?
            Tell me how I'm supposed to breathe with no air?
            Can't live, can't breathe with no air
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              • 5 years 3 months ago
              • Posts: 492
              • Account Disabled
              I didn't notice any similarites between "I Want A New Drug" and "Ghostbusters." If you ask me, Huey Lewis just wanted attention by claiming that Ghostbusters had similarites to his song. That's my opinion.
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                • 5 years 3 months ago
                • Posts: 534
                ^I kinda agree with that. I think "Ghostbusters" was a bigger hit than anything by the News, not that I'm hating.

                RetroBen81 wrote:
                princess_of_power wrote:
                ^That's a good one! And speaking of Ray Parker, Jr., his hit with Raydio "A Woman Needs Love (Just Like You Do)" from 1981 sounds eerily similar to New Edition's hit "Mr. Telephone Man" from 1984.


                Heck, Parker, Jr. even composed it.


                He composed "Mr. Telephone Man"? I never knew that.
                Garfield: "My car is so old, that it's insured against theft, flood, fire and dinosaur stampedes!"

                Garfield: "The local bus transit is doing their part to help with the weight loss program: each year, they stop further and further away from the curb!
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                  • 5 years 3 months ago
                  • Posts: 529
                  The Kinks' song "Picture Book" and Green Day's song "Warning"...

                  Edit: Oh wait, that was already on the list.
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                    • 5 years 3 months ago
                    • Posts: 709
                    Here's another "boxing match": The Cure's "The Walk" vs. New Order's "Blue Monday" (both 1983).
                    "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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                      • 2 years 6 months ago
                      • Posts: 709
                      BenJamin wrote:
                      I didn't notice any similarites between "I Want A New Drug" and "Ghostbusters." If you ask me, Huey Lewis just wanted attention by claiming that Ghostbusters had similarites to his song. That's my opinion.

                      Before Ray Parker, Jr. used his "Ghostbusters" theme as the main song for the 1984 film, there is a fact that Huey Lewis & the News had been approached to write songs for the film's score.

                      However, they declined to do it because they were busy writing songs for Back to the Future, including "The Power of Love" (a #1 hit in late August 1985) and "Back in Time."
                      "I am such a purist for old information on anything '70s and '80s."
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